diverse book

  • Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi
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    A Must Read for 2018

    Children of Blood and Bone not only made me cry at the end, but it managed to expertly tell a story where I was invested in the story and its characters. This was one of my most anticipated reads for 2018 and it did not disappoint at all.

    I was so shocked when I was sent an ARC, I literally almost happy cried as much as when I was teary eyed with sadness when I finished the story. I even did a livetweet reading of Children of Blood and Bone which you can view by clicking the link here. You can also read my immediate thoughts from a very tired Joel at 5:21am after reading here.

    I have no doubt in my mind that next to Strange the Dreamer and Six of Crows, Children of Blood and Bone sits as one of my favourite books of all time. Read More

  • Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao
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    Evil Queens Reign Forever

    I took pleasure in consuming the story of Xifeng and her ascension to the Imperial Palace. The interest I took in court intrigue, the world and the rivalry between the concubines was enough to keep me reading. The prose was beautiful and captivating, it was SO ELEGANT!! The descriptions of the many parts of the Imperial Palace and the Great Forest were so appealing and beautiful, I loved the world that I was exploring.

    A fair warning to say however that this story isn’t for the faint hearted as there are a few graphic descriptions within the story. However, they helped paint a vivid image in my mind, no matter how disturbing it might’ve been! Let’s just hope no one wants to come after my heart for some lifeblood. Read More

  • Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh
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    A Warrior Is Never Weak

    Flame in the Mist had so much potential, but I think between a plot that didn't engross me until the final third and a handful of bland characters (they aren't food, Joel), it failed to meet my hopes for the story.

    It was still a good read though, don't get me wrong. Ahdieh's descriptive prose painted wonderful pictures in my mind of the beautiful forests in Feudal Japan and I loved some of the characters. But, I definitely believe that Flame in the Mist could've been better.

    Also, I believe that this book was wrongly advertised as a Mulan retelling as the only similarities that Mariko and Mulan have is that they both dressed as men for a short while, their motivations were also about family but for completely different reasons. For Mariko, it was about honour but for Mulan, it was protecting her ill father from going to war. However, you can definitely tell it was inspired by Mulan. Mulan is my favourite disney film and I was so excited to read Flame in the Mist, but it just didn't work out for us in the end. Read More

  • It's essential for our future
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    Diversity in Literature

    Today, we live in a world where we pride ourselves on how diverse we are. We all come from different backgrounds, have different experiences and different tastes and these should all be celebrated in one way or another. We are different, and that's brilliant.

    But, think about diversity as a mirror. Marginalized people only get a small fragment of that mirror while others (namely, white allocishet people) get bigger and better pieces.

    It's important that we show diversity in popular culture such as literature. We need to show everyone that they have a place in the worlds that they read about. It's also essential that we read books that include diversity too, as it can help expand our horizons. By doing so, we can become more informed about the cultures that we read about. However, the aim of diverse authors is not to educate people on the marginalization, it's to show that these people are worth representing.  Read More

  • The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco
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    Diversity, Magic and Dancing Galore

    The Bone Witch is definitely one of my favourite reads of this year. It was my cup of Tea. (I'll stop with the puns... maybe) Perhaps, not enough to beat Strange the Dreamer but it still ranks very high! Exploring the story of The Bone Witch along with its world and the Eight Kingdoms was delightful and impressive. The diverse elements of world-building were clearly shown which WAS EXCELLENT and seeing these diverse elements integrated into the society so well had me in awe. The prose was captivating, it clung to me and didn't let me go.

    The story is told from two different perspectives (Tea and the Bard) from two different periods of time, and both are very distinct. I do like how both perspectives rely on each other to tell the story which proves they have a purpose. Also from my perspective, this book had next-to-no romance apart from a few occasions of flirting but it mostly focuses on the relationship between Tea and her brother, Fox. Read More

Hey There

Hey friends! I’m Joel, the main writer here at Fictional Fates. I’m a reader and writer who advocates for more diversity in literature.

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